Tech League


ABOUT THE TECH LEAGUE


The City Library invites everyone in Salt Lake City to join the Tech League! The Tech League is the Library's initiative to build a more digitally inclusive community through information, workshops, events, and classes. Although many in Salt Lake City use the Internet on a daily basis, others lack access to the Internet, the devices to get connected, or the skills to use them. Without access and skills, people in our community may be left disconnected from friends and family, work opportunities, information and entertainment to improve their lives, and more. The Tech League's goal is to understand who in our community lacks Internet access and to bring the Library's resources and tools to those individuals to foster independence, connection, and success in our digital world.



Northstar Digital Literacy Assessment


The Tech League subscribes to the Northstar Digital Literacy Assessment tool, which tests your ability to perform basic computer and Internet skills. By completing Northstar's ten assessment modules, you will discover what digital skills you already know and what skills you need to work on. After you've taken an assessment, refer to our Northstar Learning Guide curriculum to study up on any topics you may have answered incorrectly. You can earn a Digital Literacy Certificate if you take these assessments in a proctored environment at the Library and complete each section with at least 85% correct answers. This certificate may be used to demonstrate to potential employers or colleges that you have the core competencies in computer and Internet skills necessary to succeed in our increasingly digital world.


CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

About the Position:

The Tech League is The City Library's new program to foster a more digitally inclusive community. The City Library is looking for volunteers to help the Tech League program grow and expand to all of our branch locations.

Library volunteers are ambassadors who project a positive image of the Library and its services. Volunteers are accepting of all people and have a passion to assist diverse populations to ensure they have a positive Library experience. They are team players who have the ability to think quickly and make quality decisions. They are organized and pay attention to detail.

Volunteers must commit to serve a six-month interval, and will be evaluated following each six-month time period. Depending on the results of this six-month evaluation, volunteers may be invited to re-commit for an additional six months, or their position may be opened to a new volunteer. The Tech League volunteer program will be capped at 30 active volunteers, and these 30 available volunteer positions will be filled by the best-qualified candidates. Volunteers must adhere to the Tech League Code of Conduct.

Primary Responsibilites:

Volunteers will facilitate digital literacy education by providing one-on-one assistance to library patrons in the Main Library Technology Center; the Creative Labs in the Main Library, Glendale Branch, and Marmalade Branch; and all Library branch locations. Volunteers will help patrons with a range of tasks including setting up an email account, password retrieval, formatting in Word and Google Docs, helping patrons navigate the Library's databases, downloading eBooks and music, and streaming movies from the Library's website. Volunteers may also help facilitate/co-facilitate digital literacy workshops and help at community events. Advanced technology skills are welcome, but not required.

Minimum Qualifications:
How to set up an email account
Password retrieval
Working knowledge of Word
Working knowledge of Google Drive
Device setup (wi-fi)
Help with downloads
Knowledge of tablets/mobile devices
Resumes and online job searching
Patience

Preferred Qualifications:
Working knowledge of 3D printing and software
Working knowledge of Adobe Suite software
Teaching experience
Foreign Language expertise

Schedule:
Volunteers are required to work a minimum of two, three-hour shifts a month.
• Main Library: Mon–Thu 9am–9pm, Fri–Sat 9am–6pm, Sun 1–5pm
• Anderson-Foothill Branch: Wed 10am–12pm, Thu 6–9pm
• Chapman Branch: Sat 2–4pm, Sun 3–5pm
• Day-Riverside Branch: Mon–Thu 4–6pm
• Glendale Branch: TBD
• Marmalade Branch: Mon–Fri 3–6pm, Sat 10am–6pm
• Sprague Branch: TBD
• Sweet Branch: TBD

Other Information:

Completion of criminal background check will be required, if the candidate is over eighteen (18) years of age.

How to apply:

Fill out the Tech League Volunteer Application.
This is an ongoing recruitment process.



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What is digital inclusion?


The National Digital Inclusion Alliance defines digital inclusion as the goals and activities necessary to ensure that all individuals and communities, including the most disadvantaged, have equity in access to and use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This includes 5 elements:

1) affordable, robust broadband internet service
2) Internet-enabled devices that meet their needs
3) sufficient digital literacy skills and access to training
4) quality technical support
5) applications and online content designed to enable and encourage self-sufficiency, diverse participation, and collaboration.

Digital Inclusion is ever evolving as technology advances and recognizes that access to—and use of—ICTs is an essential element for participation in our society and economy.


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What is digital equity?


The National Digital Inclusion Alliance defines digital equity as the ultimate outcome of full digital inclusion, with focused action and investments to eliminate historic, systemic, and structural barriers that perpetuate digitally disadvantaged individuals and communities. Digital equity recognizes our social obligation to harness Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to address the needs of disadvantaged individuals, as well as communities or neighborhoods, community-based organizations, and small businesses.


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How can my community be more digitally inclusive?


Digitally-inclusive communities provide:

Open-access computer labs
Public wi-fi
Free/low cost relevant digital literacy education
Community mentors
Training focused on relevant skills and use of technology rather than on "how to use technology," i.e. online dating classes, job searching, and navigating websites.
Teaching circles: community members become experts and train other community members (teens-seniors, tech professionals from their community, etc)


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What is digital literacy education?


Digital literacy education gives individuals the knowledge to interact with technology to learn new skills; communicate with family and friends anywhere in the world for free; or access education, healthcare, financial, or social service resources. Examples of digital literacy education include:

Helping an individual set up an email account for the first time
A drop-in class discussing online identity theft
A series of classes that create a pathway to a career in technology
How to use Google Drive
Learning how to use YouTube to learn to play the guitar
Showing someone how to download pictures from their camera to a Facebook account


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Who is affected by the digital inequities?


Digital inequity is the historic, systemic, and structural barriers that perpetuate digitally disadvantaged individuals and communities. The reasons for digital inequity may vary, based on available infrastructure and costs, discrimination or lack of investment in delivering technology and technology-related services to a specific area or to a specific population, or, for a given population, based on discriminating factors, which may include socioeconomic status, education, literacy, special needs or disabilities, language barriers, and culturally- or age-appropriate design and delivery of services. Digital inequities can impede all areas of community development: workforce development, economic development, equitable education, accessing health records, accessing financial services, and access to social services.


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What are some of the barriers to home broadband service and individuals using the Internet?


There are several reasons individuals may not have access to home broadband service. Some people do not have the skills or digital literacy education to be able to use the internet in their home. Some individuals do not see the relevance of having home broadband service. Cost can also be a barrier.




Related Materials



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


In 2015, the Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) launched the Digital Inclusion Fellowship with Google Fiber, combining on-the-ground digital inclusion initiatives with national networks and experienced leaders to help nonprofits bridge the digital divide. The Digital Inclusion Fellowship model recruits emerging leaders from digitally-divided communities to spend one year working towards increasing digital literacy and broadband adoption in their cities at community-based organizations. To learn more about the Fellowship and to meet the Fellows, visit nten.org/dif.

Financial support for the Tech League is provided in part by the Friends of The City Library. Thanks to their generous donation, additional funding is available for Tech League classes, outreach events, and device purchase. NTEN will match these donated funds in support of The City Library's digital inclusion initiative.

Digital Inclusion